Saturday, October 30, 2010

November Project of the Month

The "November Project of the Month" is a winner! Knit these fabulous "Welted Fingerless Gloves" for everyone on your holiday gift list. This project takes only one skein of Debbie Bliss "Andes", (an alpaca and mulberry silk blend) and costs less than $20.00 to make. I know I'll be making a bunch of these as teacher gifts this year. How about you?

Just to get you started we are offering you a sweet deal. Mention seeing this on our blog and take 20% off Debbie Bliss Andes. While supplies last.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

The Sensational Shirttail Adventure Contines

Hip Hip Hooray! I have completed the back and Cheryl has completed her first sleeve. The finished pieces look beautiful if we say so ourselves. The Kathmandu is showing the stitch definition wonderfully and Cheryl’s sleeve looks very sheik with a solid cuff. She decided to have the wrong side of the cuff be the right side because she liked the way the horizontal slipped stitches looked on the outside of the cuff when it was turned up. So the cast on has begun for the next sweater parts: I have started with the right front and Cheryl with the second sleeve.

Happy Knitting,
Carole and Cheryl

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

TO RIP OR NOT TO RIP –That is the question.

Your initial response may be, “…you made a mistake, of course rip it out and correct it.” Not so fast my fellow knitter. I believe there are three phases to the decision to rip or not to rip: recognition, debate and decision.

I was happily knitting along on the project Cheryl and I have coveted for so long and happy to finally be making my own version of Mary’s Sensational Shirttail Cardigan. I started with the back of the sweater and was on the fifth 8 -row repeat. The cables looked beautiful, I was delighted with the Moss stitch framed by a slipped stitch on each side and then, “Oh #$%#!. I noticed that about two repeats back I had evidently held the yarn in front of my work when I slipped the stitch on one side of the Moss stitch section. Recognition! Phase two began immediately and I began to debate with myself. For those of you who have never been in this position, it goes something like this, “…how bad is it? Will anyone notice? Can I live with it this way? OMG how many rows do I have to rip? Will I be able to get the stitches back on the needle and figure out where I am in the pattern?” These thoughts for me come in a rush all at once and are then followed by, “What would you tell a fellow knitter or customer at the Web if they came in with the same dilemma?” So I made a decision: have a glass of wine and sleep on it.

This morning I my thoughts were very clear and the decision was made: I would rip! Yes it involved undoing a fair amount of work. Yes I would have to be careful to count the number of rows I ripped and be ever so careful putting the stitches back on the needle to stay in pattern. I began to rip as I had my first cup of coffee-which could have had fatal results, but in the end I ripped 12 rows back and successfully returned the stitches to the needle and put the markers in their correct places. I am now happily continuing on quest to finish the back, hopefully with more care when I slip those stitches on either side of the Moss stitch section.

Here are a few tips for ripping:
1. Gather some tools that you may need to make the task easier – a crochet hook and a smaller size needle.
2. Place the piece to be ripped on a firm flat surface.
3. Rip slowly and carefully and count the number of rows you rip.
4. Put the stitches on the smaller needle and then transfer them to the needle you are using for the project (it is easier to pick them up with a smaller needle)
5. Reorient the stitches as you transfer them back to the larger needle.

So I am back on track and hope to finish the back by next week. Cheryl started with the sleeves first-you remember she is using two different yarns, needs about three inches to finish the first sleeve. Have you started yours yet?
Happy Knitting,